What's 1 More Degree

for THIS colored girl who considered getting a MA when her BAs weren't enuf
cartoonpolitics:

Student loan debt has more than doubled since 2006, from $509 billion to a staggering $1.3 trillion. It now accounts for 40% of all personal debt – more than credit card debts and auto loans.

cartoonpolitics:

Student loan debt has more than doubled since 2006, from $509 billion to a staggering $1.3 trillion. It now accounts for 40% of all personal debt – more than credit card debts and auto loans.

Because on my days off I cook and today I wanted Mac n Cheese

Because on my days off I cook and today I wanted Mac n Cheese

Tony Porter: A Call To Men
"Tony is the original visionary and co-founder behind A CALL TO MEN: The National Association of Men and Women Committed to Ending Violence Against Women. He is the author of "Well Meaning Men...Breaking Out of the Man Box - Ending Violence Against Women" and the visionary for the book, NFL Dads Dedicated to Daughters.

Tony's message of accountability is welcome and supported by many grassroots and established organizations. He’s currently working with numerous domestic and sexual violence programs, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, colleges and universities around the country. He has worked with the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

Tony is an international lecturer for the U.S. State Department having worked in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Kingdom and Brazil. In addition, he has been a guest presenter for the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women and has been a script consultant for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." - (x)

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via beautiful-ambition)

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.
McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”
McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:


"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."


In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:


"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:
" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’
"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.
"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:
" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’
"McCain says he was stunned:
" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."
"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.
"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."



Source



RIP, sir. Thank you for your sacrifice

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.

McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”

McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:

"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."

In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:

"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:

" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’

"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.

"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:

" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’

"McCain says he was stunned:

" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."

"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.

"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."

RIP, sir. Thank you for your sacrifice

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

The idea behind minimum wage…

detrea:

The premise of minimum wage, when it was introduced, was that a single wage earner should be able to own a home and support a family.  That was what it was based on; a full time job, any job, should be able to accomplish this.

The fact people scoff at this idea if presented nowadays, as though the people that ring up your groceries or hand you your burgers don’t deserve the luxury of a home and a family, is disgusting.

(via aestheticintrovert)